State Police Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement November 27-29: 314 Compliance Checks; 10 Notices of Violation

 
Harrisburg, PA – Pennsylvania State Police Liquor Control Enforcement Officers visited 314 licensed liquor establishments from Friday, November 27 through Sunday, November 29 to ensure businesses are abiding by COVID-19 mitigation requirements that include social distancing, masking, and other health and safety requirements of the liquor code.
Liquor Control Enforcement Officers issued 10 notices of violation and 22 warnings for failing to follow COVID-19 requirements. As mandated by the liquor code, a notice of violation precedes the issuance of an administrative citation, which is civil in nature, and is intended to provide licensed liquor establishments notification of the nature of violation(s) discovered. The investigation remains open during this period, pending review by the Pennsylvania State Police Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement (BLCE). Because the investigation is ongoing, names of establishments issued a notice of violation will not be released at this time. Each BLCE district office posts a monthly public information release that includes details on citations issued by that office.
Compliance checks are unannounced and can occur anywhere in the commonwealth, although the focus is on areas experiencing higher coronavirus transmission rates. Among other requirements, all businesses and employees in the restaurant and retail food service industry authorized to conduct in-person activities are mandated to:
  • Require all customers to wear masks while entering, exiting or otherwise traveling throughout the restaurant or retail food service business (face masks may be removed while seated). Further, employees are required to wear masks at all times.
  • Provide at least six feet between parties at tables or physical barriers between customers where booths are arranged back to back.
  • Ensure maximum occupancy limits for indoor and outdoor areas are posted and enforced.
Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement | November 27-29, 2020
​TOTAL LICENSEE CHECKS
WARNINGS RELATED TO COVID-19 MITIGATION EFFORTS
NOTICES OF VIOLATION RELATED TO COVID-19 MITIGATION EFFORTS
1-Philadelphia
​109
1
0
2-Wilkes-Barre
43
1
3
3-Harrisburg
30
5
1
4-Pittsburgh
28
1
1
5-Altoona
15
0
0
6-Williamsport
20
2
0
7-Punxsutawney
16
2
4
8-Erie
4
1
0
9-Allentown
49
9
1
TOTALS
314
22
10
Violators may face administrative citation by the Pennsylvania State Police Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement. Continued violations put an establishment’s liquor license at risk, either through the citation process or upon application for renewal. More information is available on the enforcement page of the state police COVID-19 portal.
Complaints regarding licensees not complying with COVID-19 mitigation mandates may be directed to the BLCE at 1-800-932-0602 or reported through the BLCE’s online complaint form.

Pennsylvania COVID-19 Early Warning Monitoring Dashboard Update for Nov. 20 – Nov. 26: Case Increases Top 41,000; Percent Positivity at 11.7% and 66 Counties with Substantial Transmission

Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf and Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine today released a weekly status update detailing the state’s mitigation efforts based on the COVID-19 Early Warning Monitoring System Dashboard, highlighting a seven-day case increase of 41,424 cases, statewide percent positivity of 11.7%, and 66 of 67 counties with substantial transmission status.

The update includes the following:

  • Level of community transmission as a basis for the recommendations for Pre-K to 12 schools to determine instructional models.
  • Data on cases among 5-18-year-olds.
  • Cases that reported visiting a business among potential locations where exposures may have occurred.
  • Updated travel recommendations.

The dashboard is designed to provide early warning signs of factors that affect the state’s mitigation efforts. The data available on the early warning monitoring dashboard includes week-over-week case differences, incidence rates, test percent-positivity, and rates of hospitalizations, ventilations and emergency room visits tied to COVID-19. This week’s update compares the period of November 20 – November 26 to the previous seven days, November 13 – November 19.

“Pennsylvania continues to trend in the wrong direction as COVID-19 continues to spread,” Gov. Wolf said. “Last week, we took a number of mitigation steps designed to reverse this trend and help protect Pennsylvanians. We need all Pennsylvanians to follow these measures as part of their collective responsibility to protect one another. I remain convinced that by working together Pennsylvanians can stop the spread of this virus.”

As of Thursday, November 26, the state has seen a seven-day case increase of 41,424 cases; the previous seven-day increase was 37,380 cases, indicating 4,044 more new cases across the state over the past week compared to the previous week.

The statewide percent-positivity went up to 11.7% from 11.1% last week. Every county in the state has a concerning percent positivity above five percent except for one county, Forest County at 3.6 percent. This includes five counties (Juniata, Mifflin, Bedford, Somerset and Tioga) with percent positivity above 20 percent.

“This week’s data, and the one week change in the rate of hospitalizations and ventilator use is a reminder to us all of our role in protecting our health care system,” Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “Latest models continue to indicate very concerning trends for our hospital availability and ICU bed availability. We know COVID-19 does not discriminate and is affecting every county in the commonwealth. It is affecting all Pennsylvanians, no matter your race, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status or whether you live a rural, suburban or urban area.”

Community Transmission

As of Friday’s data, Adams, Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Bedford, Berks, Blair, Bradford, Bucks, Butler, Cambria, Carbon, Centre, Chester, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Columbia, Crawford, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Elk, Erie, Fayette, Forest, Franklin, Fulton, Greene, Huntingdon, Indiana, Jefferson, Juniata, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lawrence, Lebanon, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, McKean, Mercer, Mifflin, Monroe, Montgomery, Montour, Northampton, Northumberland, Perry, Philadelphia, Pike, Potter, Schuylkill, Snyder, Somerset, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Union, Venango, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Westmoreland, Wyoming, and York counties were in the substantial level of community transmission.

For the week ending November 26, one county was in the low level of transmission and 66 counties were in the substantial level of transmission: Cameron.

Cases Among 5-18-Year-Olds
The Department of Health is providing weekly data on the number of statewide cases of COVID-19 among 5 to 18-year-olds.

Throughout the pandemic, there have been 27,954 total cases of COVID-19 among 5 to 18-year-olds. Of that total, 4,212 occurred between November 20 – November 26. For the week of November 13 – November 19, there were 3,937 cases of COVID-19 among 5 to 18-year-olds.

Cases by demographic group is available on the DOH website.

Business Visits
The Department of Health is providing weekly data on the number of individuals who responded to case investigators that they spent time at business establishments (restaurants, bars, gym/fitness centers, salon/barbershops) and at mass gatherings 14 days prior to the onset of COVID-19 symptoms.

It is important to note that due to the recent number of cases, the department is prioritizing case investigations. In addition to the need for people to answer the call, the significant number of cases helps contribute to the low percentages in contact tracing data. All of this reinforces the need for Pennsylvanians to take steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Of the 44,525 confirmed cases reported between November 15 and November 21, 7 percent (3,038) provided an answer to the question as to whether they spent time at a business establishment.

Of those who did provide an answer, 0.9 percent, or 392, answered yes, they visited a business establishment 14 days prior to onset of symptoms:

  • 51 percent (200) of those who said yes reported going to a restaurant;
  • 24.5 percent (96) of those who said yes reported going to some other business establishment;
  • 15 percent (60) of those who said yes reported going to a bar;
  • 10 percent (39) of those who said yes reported going to a gym/fitness center; and
  • 8 percent (31) of those who said yes reported going to a salon/barbershop.

Of the 44,525 confirmed cases, 6.9 percent (3,063) answered the question as to whether they attended a mass gathering or other large event. Of the 6.9 percent, 13 percent (398) answered yes to whether they attended a mass gathering or other large event 14 days prior to onset of symptoms.

Compared to data reported on November 23, this week’s data indicated an increase for people who reported going to a restaurant (51 percent vs. 48 percent last week), going to a salon/barbershop (8 percent vs. 7 percent last week), and slight increases for those going to some other business (24.5 percent vs. 24 percent last week) and going to a bar (15.3 percent vs. 15 percent last week). The data saw a decrease for people who reported going to a gym/fitness center (10 percent vs. 14 percent last week). The number of those who attended a mass gathering or other large event decreased to 13 percent from 16.3 percent last week.

The numbers above highlight business settings and mass gatherings as possible sites for transmission. With less than half of those asked about what types of businesses they visited or if they attended a mass gathering responding to the question, the department is reminding Pennsylvanians that it is essential that people answer the phone when case investigators call and to provide full and complete information to these clinical professionals.

Travel Recommendations
This week, the Department of Health provided an updated travel order requiring anyone over the age of 11 who visits from another state to provide evidence of a negative COVID-19 test or place themselves in a travel quarantine for 14 days upon entering Pennsylvania.

This order, which took effect on Wednesday, November 25, does not apply to people who commute to and from another state for work or medical treatment, those who left the state for less than 24 hours, and those complying with a court order, including child custody.

It is important that people understand that this Order is in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Pennsylvania. A concerning number of recent cases have been linked to travel, and if people are going to travel, we need them to take steps to protect themselves, their loved ones and their community, and that involves having either a negative test, or placing themselves in a travel quarantine.

Gov. Wolf continues to prioritize the health and safety of all Pennsylvanians through the COVID-19 pandemic. Pennsylvanians should continue to take actions to prevent the spread of COVID-19, regardless of in what county they live. This includes wearing a mask or face covering anytime they are in public. COVID-19 has been shown to spread easily in the air and contagious carriers can be asymptomatic.

Wolf Admin. Awards $3 Million in Funding to Protect Pennsylvanians Experiencing Homelessness This Winter  

Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced that $3 million in grant funding has been awarded to 15 municipalities and organizations spanning 20 counties to assist Pennsylvanians currently experiencing homelessness.

“All Pennsylvanians are entitled to safe shelter, and that is never more important than in the cold winter months,” said Gov. Wolf. “This funding will help ensure that our communities can safeguard the health of all residents and protect them from the elements while working to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in the commonwealth.” 

The commonwealth recently received its second allocation of Emergency Solutions Grant funding from the CARES Act (ESG-CV) funds, and the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) set aside a portion of those funds to create the ESG-CV Code Blue program, which helps provide emergency shelter in preparation for the winter months.

Under the program, funding will be provided for emergency shelter and temporary emergency shelter to expand shelter for those experiencing homelessness in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The funds will be used to assist homeless providers and communities prepare for, prevent the spread of and respond to the coronavirus by providing emergency shelter, targeted street outreach, and temporary emergency shelter for individuals experiencing homelessness this winter.

A full list of awardees can be found here.

Nearly $102,000 has been awarded for street outreach, more than $2 million for emergency shelter, more than $775,000 for temporary emergency shelter, and the remainder of the funds will be used for administration and the Homeless Information Management System.

Another request for proposals to award the remaining $16.9 million of ESG-CV funds available, which will include all eligible ESG-CV activities, will be released in the beginning of 2021.

Assistance is also available for individuals until April 9, 2021 through the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP). LIHEAP provides assistance for home heating bills so low-income Pennsylvanians can stay warm and safe during the winter months. Assistance is available for renters and homeowners. Pennsylvanians can apply for LIHEAP and other public assistance programs online at www.compass.state.pa.us.

Pennsylvanians Age 13 and Older Can Add Their Phone to the Fight

Harrisburg, PA – Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine and Acting Secretary of Education Noe Ortega today announced that, with parental or guardian permission, Pennsylvanians age 13 to 17 can now add their phone to the fight and download the COVID Alert PA app to help stop the spread of COVID-19.

“While the app has been available to Pennsylvanians 18 and older, we wanted to ensure more residents had access to these resources and can be notified if exposed to COVID-19,” Dr. Levine said. “By expanding the age range, we can hopefully increase the number of individuals who download the app, increasing its effectiveness to help control the spread of this dangerous virus, especially in school settings. I encourage everyone to download COVID Alert PA and answer the call to wash your hands, social distance, and wear a mask so we can unite together against COVID-19.”

“The Pennsylvania Department of Education is issuing a call to action to all youth in our commonwealth: We urge you to download the free COVID Alert PA app to help slow the spread of COVID-19,” said Acting Secretary of Education Noe Ortega. “Help keep yourself, your families, and your communities safe by utilizing your phone in the fight against the spread of this disease.”

COVID Alert PA is a free and voluntary mobile app developed by the Pennsylvania Department of Health in partnership with NearForm, University of Pennsylvania and MIT Lincoln Laboratory using Apple and Google’s Exposure Notification System. The app’s features include an interactive COVID-19 symptom check-in, alerts for potential exposures to the virus, updates on the latest public health data about COVID-19 in PA and public health guidance for what to do if you have a potential exposure to COVID-19.

In this new update, the Department of Health will share further data resources on the app to provide the most up to date COVID-19 county case counts and hospitalizations. The update will also include an information hub, where residents learn more about contact tracing, app compatibility with other states, and where to find a testing location and other assistance and benefits.

We encourage you to download the app so if you test positive for COVID-19, you can then enter a unique six-digit code given to you by a case investigator. This will allow individuals you may have encountered in proximity and who have the app know that they have been exposed to COVID-19. They can then take important steps to protect themselves and others such as getting tested or quarantining. Most importantly, this will help cut the chain of COVID-19 transmission.

The app is also designed to ensure privacy of the user. It does not use GPS, location services or any movement or geographical information. It will never collect, transmit or store personal information. It is completely anonymous.

The app does collect user statistics such as the number of downloads or the symptom check-in demographics that people can voluntarily share. Since the launch on September 22, we know:

  • There have been 622,000 downloads onto smartphone devices.
  • There were 326 positive cases who confirmed their positivity through the app, which generated 144 close-contact exposure alerts.
  • Of those who received an exposure alert, 21 requested a call-back to speak with a trained contact tracer for further support.

Download the COVID Alert PA app and make your phone part of the fight. The free app can be found in the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store by searching for “covid alert pa.”

The Wolf Administration stresses the role Pennsylvanians play in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
  • Clean surfaces frequently.
  • Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
  • If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.
  • Download the COVID Alert PA app and make your phone part of the fight. The free app can be found in the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store by searching for “covid alert pa”.

All Pennsylvania residents are encouraged to sign up for AlertPA, a text notification system for health, weather, and other important alerts like COVID-19 updates from commonwealth agencies. Residents can sign up online at www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/Signup-For-Alerts.

November 30, 2020 – Department of Health Report

One hundred thirty three (133) new cases added Sunday and Monday in Lycoming County now at 2,200 cases, no new deaths, 38 total deaths, with 19,199 negatives according to DOH report.

Department of Health Provides Update on COVID-19:

4,405 Patients Hospitalized and 918 Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

Two-Day Total of 9,797 Additional Positive Cases of COVID-19

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Health today confirmed as of 12:00 a.m., November 30, that there were 4,268 new cases, in addition to 5,529 new cases reported Sunday, November 29 for a two-day total of 9,797 additional positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 361,464.

There are 4,405 individuals hospitalized with COVID-19. Of that number, 918 patients are in the intensive care unit with COVID-19. Most of the patients hospitalized are ages 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. More data is available here.

The trend in the 14-day moving average of number of hospitalized patients per day has increased by nearly 3,000 since the end of September.

Statewide percent positivity for the week of November 20 – November 26 stood at 11.7%.

The most accurate daily data is available on the website, with archived data also available.

The number of tests administered within the last 7 days between November 23 and November 29 is 392,547 with 47,557 positive cases. There were 47,836 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., November 28 and 33,486 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., November 29.

As of 11:59 p.m., Saturday, November 28, there were 75 new deaths and as of 11:59 p.m., Sunday, November 29, there were 32 new deaths reported for a total of 10,383 deaths attributed to COVID-19. County-specific information and a statewide map are available on the COVID-19 Data Dashboard.

Mask-wearing is required in all businesses and whenever leaving home. Consistent mask-wearing is critical to preventing the spread of COVID-19.

There are 16,951 individuals who have a positive viral antigen test and are considered probable cases and 639 individuals who have a positive serology test and either COVID-19 symptoms or a high-risk exposure.

There are 2,828,049 individuals who have tested negative to date. Of those who have tested positive to date the age breakdown is as follows:

  • Approximately 1% are ages 0-4;
  • Nearly 3% are ages 5-12;
  • Nearly 6% are ages 13-18;
  • Approximately 12% are ages 19-24;
  • Nearly 37% are ages 25-49;
  • Nearly 22% are ages 50-64; and
  • Nearly 20% are ages 65 or older.

The department has seen significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds. An alert was sent to healthcare providers about the changing COVID-19 case demographics. Increases among 19 to 24-year-olds from April to present in November are available below:

  • NC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 16 percent of cases so far in November;
  • SE – Nearly 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 11 percent of cases so far in November;
  • NE – 6 percent of cases in April to approximately 13 percent of cases so far in November;
  • SW – Approximately 5 percent of cases in April to 10 percent of cases so far in November;
  • NW – Nearly 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 11 percent of cases so far in November; and
  • SC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to approximately 8 percent of cases so far in November.

In nursing and personal care homes, there are 35,367 resident cases of COVID-19, and 6,661 cases among employees, for a total of 42,028 at 1,266 distinct facilities in 64 counties. Out of our total deaths, 6,477 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities. A county breakdown can be found here.

Approximately 14,499 of our total cases are among health care workers.
 

The Wolf Administration stresses the role Pennsylvanians play in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
  • Clean surfaces frequently.
  • Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
  • If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.
  • Download the COVID Alert PA app and make your phone part of the fight. The free app can be found in the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store by searching for “covid alert pa”.

All Pennsylvania residents are encouraged to sign up for AlertPA, a text notification system for health, weather, and other important alerts like COVID-19 updates from commonwealth agencies. Residents can sign up online at www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/Signup-For-Alerts.

Wolf Admin. Secures $16 Million Pennsylvania Farm Bill, Highlights 2019 Programs that Aided PA Farmers through Pandemic

Harrisburg, PA – Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding today applauded the state legislature for once again funding Governor Tom Wolf’s Pennsylvania Farm Bill in the 2020-21 Pennsylvania Budget. The first-ever Pennsylvania Farm Bill was signed into law in July 2019 and was transformative for the commonwealth’s leading industry.

“We began this journey with the Pennsylvania Farm Bill two years ago, when Governor Wolf laid out his vision to strengthen Pennsylvania’s agriculture industry and secure a prosperous future,” said Redding. “And while no one could predict the toils of 2020, the governor’s 2019 multi-million dollar investment to support the industry that sustains life for us all put infrastructure in place that made 2020 a little less painful for some, and put others in a position to pivot and meet radically altered demand.

“That foresight into what this industry and our commonwealth’s food supply chain needed was spot on, and we look forward to using this next round of funding to strengthen the weak links found as we maneuvered a pandemic,” added Redding.

In 2020, the Center for Poultry & Livestock Excellence, created and funded through the Pennsylvania Farm Bill, provided $280,000 in reimbursement to Pennsylvania’s animal ag industry for the purchase of personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect the workforce. The center also provided guidance to the industry on strengthening biosecurity plans to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.

As communities across the commonwealth faced immense challenges with food insecurity as a result of COVID-19 mitigation efforts, urban communities that took advantage of the PA Farm Bill’s Urban Agriculture Grant program had new infrastructure in place to combat food insecurity by growing their own food and improving access to food for their neighborhoods. The 2019 program funded 28 projects with $500,000.

Pennsylvania’s dairy industry was most notably affected by the pandemic, as rapidly changing markets caused farmers to dump fresh, nutritious milk down the drain. However, some dairy farmers had already diversified their markets and found new opportunities through the PA Farm Bill’s $5 million Dairy Investment Program. The program offered dairy farmers an opportunity to sustain and grow their business through on-farm innovation, organic transition, and diversification through value-added products such as cheese, yogurt, and ice cream. The 2019 program funded 46 projects.

A full review of accomplishments from the 2019 Pennsylvania Farm Bill can be found in The PA Farm Bill in Review, an article on the department’s blog.

The $16 million 2020 Pennsylvania Farm Bill includes:

Resources for Business Development & Succession Planning

  • PA Agricultural Business Development Center, funded at $2 million, to serve as a resource to create business, transition, or succession plans.
  • Realty Transfer Tax Exemption for any transfer of preserved farmland to a qualified beginning farmer.

Creating More Processing Capabilities

  • Center for Poultry & Livestock Excellence, funded at $1 million, to support the animal ag industry with biosecurity planning and disease prevention, processing capacity, and food safety and quality assurance.
  • Incentivizing Access to Meat Processing Inspections, funded at $500,000, to encourage access to new and expanded markets for small or new producers.

Removing Regulatory Burdens

  • Resource Enhancement and Protection Tax Credits, expanded by $3 million, to increase the lifetime cap and increase availability.
  • Conservation Excellence Grant Program, funded at $2 million, to provide financial and technical assistance to farmers to install and implement best management practices.
  • Agriculture Linked Investment Program, funded at $500,000, to re-establish this low interest loan program for the implementation of best management practices.

Strengthening the Ag Workforce

  • Agriculture and Youth Grant Program, funded at $500,000, to reestablish this program to fund agricultural and youth organizations to help increase knowledge and awareness of agriculture in the commonwealth.
  • The PA Farm to School Grant Program, funded at $500,000, to improve childhood nutrition while increasing exposure to agriculture.

Protecting Agricultural Infrastructure

  • PA Rapid Response Disaster Readiness Account, funded at $3 million, to allow for quick response to agricultural disasters, such as Spotted Lanternfly or Avian Influenza; or providing an immediate response to a foodborne illness.

Increasing Market Opportunities

  • PA Preferred Organic, funded at $1.6 million, to make Pennsylvania the nation’s leading organic state by further enhancing the growth of the organic industry.
  • PA Preferred Program, funded at an additional $1 million, to support the program and to bolster enrollment in Homegrown by Heroes.
  • State-level Specialty Crop Block Grant Program, funded at $500,000, to invest in and encourage farming of high-priority horticultural crops like hemp, hops, and hardwoods.
  • Urban Agriculture, funded at $500,000, to improve agriculture infrastructure in urban areas, the aggregation of product, sharing of resources, and support development efforts.

“As we close what will be known in history books as one of the most challenging years for Pennsylvania agriculture, we look forward to cultivating a brighter tomorrow through this next round of PA Farm Bill funding,” said Redding. “We’ll work to make this industry whole again, using our experiences from 2020 to strengthen our programs for the industry we so clearly rely on.”

For more about the Pennsylvania Farm Bill visit agriculture.pa.gov/pafarmbill. The department is actively working to roll out grant programs for the 2020 funding and will make announcements as programs are available for applications.

Crosscutters Continue Affiliation with Major League Baseball in New MLB Draft League

Major League Baseball in conjunction with Prep Baseball Report (PBR) have announced the formation of the all-new MLB Draft League set to launch in 2021. The league, which will include the Williamsport Crosscutters, becomes the first in the country focused on top prospects eligible to be drafted by MLB Clubs that summer.

With the MLB Draft now being held as part of MLB All-Star Week in mid-July, draft-eligible players will have a unique opportunity to showcase their abilities and gain exposure to MLB Clubs and fans each year.

The Williamsport Crosscutters will be joined by the Trenton Thunder (formerly of the Double-A Eastern League) Mahoning Valley Scrappers, State College Spikes and West Virginia Black Bears (all formerly of the New York-Penn League) as founding members of the MLB Draft League. MLB is in advanced negotiations with a sixth club which will be announced in the coming weeks.

The MLB Draft League will feature a 68-game regular season that is scheduled to run from late May to mid-August with an annual All-Star Break centered around the MLB Draft. Players will receive unprecedented visibility to MLB Club scouts through in-person observation and state-of-the-art scouting technology, as well as instruction from former MLB players and educational programming designed to prepare them for careers as professional athletes. MLB and Prep Baseball Report will assign players and coaching staffs for each team as well as provide league administrative functions.

The Crosscutters have scheduled a special Facebook Live event for Tuesday, December 8 at 7 pm where fans can learn more about the MLB Draft League from members of the Cutters front office and have an opportunity to ask questions about the upcoming season. The event can be accessed at the team’s Facebook page, @WilliamsportCrosscutters. Those unable to view the live event can watch a recorded version of the session anytime on the Williamsport Crosscutters Facebook page.

CLICK HERE to see some Frequently Asked Questions

“We are ecstatic to have Williamsport continue to be a gateway to the Majors in the all new MLB Draft League and cannot wait for another season of Crosscutters baseball.” Peter B. Freund – President & Principal Owner, Williamsport Crosscutters

“We are thrilled to partner with Prep Baseball Report and the founding members of the MLB Draft League to create a one-of-a-kind league that will attract the nation’s top players who are eligible for each year’s MLB Draft and allow local fans to see top prospects and future big-league stars in their hometowns. This announcement continues MLB’s commitment to preserving and growing baseball in communities around the United States.” Morgan Sword – Executive Vice President Baseball Economics & Operations, Major League Baseball

“We are excited to hear about MLB’s commitment to the Crosscutters and to Williamsport and are looking forward to baseball’s return here.” Derek Slaughter – Mayor, City of Williamsport

“Ask anyone from Williamsport and they will tell you that the Cutters are more than just a baseball team. They are a cornerstone of our community, providing affordable family entertainment for our region. This partnership will bring new life to the Cutters and ensure that Williamsport remains the baseball capital of the world.” Congressman Fred Keller – U.S. House of Representatives (PA 12)

“This is really great news for the Crosscutters organization as well as north central Pennsylvania,” said state Sen. Gene Yaw (R-23). “The possibility of not having a professional baseball team in Williamsport, the home of Little League Baseball, was a major concern. Now, the MLB Draft League presents an opportunity to grow the game, while safeguarding the Cutters presence in our region. Let’s play ball!” State Senator Gene Yaw – Pennsylvania State Senate (PA 23)

“This is GREAT news not only for the Crosscutters but for Williamsport and Central Pennsylvania together! As we just experienced this past year, a summer without local baseball just doesn’t seem like summer. Congratulations to all and I look forward to the umpire saying PLAY Ball!” State Rep. Jeff Wheeland – Pennsylvania State House of Representatives (PA-83)

“We’ve had a proud tradition of professional baseball in Williamsport dating back to the late 1800’s. It is great to hear that this tradition will continue with the MLB Draft League. I will be excited to watch draft-eligible players show off their talents and then get to see them in the MLB in a few years.” State Rep. Garth Everett – Pennsylvania State House of Representatives (PA 84)

“I am pleased to hear of the exciting news that baseball will remain in Williamsport with the new MLB Draft League. Williamsport’s long baseball history has laid the foundation for many that entered the major leagues. We look forward to continuing that tradition of having America’s past time in our backyard.” Scott L. Metzger, Chairman Lycoming County Commissioners

“We are excited to see that developmental baseball will continue here in Williamsport. From 1869 when professional baseball started to today, the sport has continued to evolve. It’s great to see that Williamsport will play a key role in this latest evolution of the sport. As a baseball fan personally, I look forward to seeing these prospects grow, develop and hopefully realize their dream of playing Major League Baseball. To me, there is no better place than the home and birthplace of Little League Baseball to foster this opportunity for these players.” Jason Fink – President & CEO, Williamsport/Lycoming Chamber of Commerce

 

MLB ANNOUNCES NEW “MLB DRAFT LEAGUE”

First-of-Its-Kind MLB Draft League to Launch in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and New Jersey

 Plan Retains High-Level Baseball in These Communities for the Long-Term

Major League Baseball, Prep Baseball Report (PBR), and five founding members today announced the formation of the MLB Draft League, which will become the first league in the country focused on top prospects who are eligible to be drafted by MLB Clubs that summer.  With the 2021 MLB Draft moved back to July and being held as part of All-Star Week, draft-eligible players will have a unique opportunity to showcase their abilities and gain exposure to MLB Clubs and fans next summer.  The new format affirms MLB’s commitment to the region and assures that communities of Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and New Jersey will continue to host high-caliber baseball and future Major Leaguers for years to come. 

The founding members of the MLB Draft League will be the Mahoning Valley Scrappers, the State College Spikes, the Trenton Thunder, the West Virginia Black Bears, and the Williamsport Crosscutters.  The League is in advanced discussions with a sixth team and hopes to announce in the coming weeks.  Plans include a 68-game regular season with an annual All-Star Break centered around the MLB Draft.  MLB Draft League participants will receive unprecedented visibility to MLB Club scouts through both in-person observation and state-of-the-art scouting technology, and educational programming designed to prepare them for careers as professional athletes.  PBR will provide support for the league’s staffing, player and coach recruitment, on-field operations, and administrative functions. PBR will also use their media and technology platforms to promote the league and its players throughout the season.

Today’s announcement follows the late September announcement of the Appalachian League’s evolution into the premier college wood bat league for the nation’s top rising freshmen and sophomores, and is part of MLB’s broader efforts to modernize player development while preserving baseball in the local communities in which it is currently played. More announcements, including additional members of the MLB Draft League, other MLB-sponsored leagues as well as licensed affiliates, will follow in the coming weeks.

Kerrick Jackson will serve as President of the MLB Draft League.  Prior to joining PBR, Jackson served as the head coach at Southern University, where he led a nine-win team to the NCAA Tournament in three years.  For three years, Jackson was the Midwest Area Scouting Supervisor for the Washington Nationals, overseeing Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, Iowa, Nebraska and the Dakotas.  Jackson served as the recruiting coordinator at the University of Missouri for five years (2010-2015) and has held assistant roles at Nicholls State University, Fairfield University, Emporia State University and Coffeyville Community College.  He has coached in the Cape Cod League and New England Collegiate Baseball League.

Morgan Sword, MLB’s Executive Vice President, Baseball Economics & Operations, said: “We are thrilled to partner with Prep Baseball Report and the founding members of the MLB Draft League to create a one-of-a-kind league that will attract the nation’s top players who are eligible for each year’s MLB Draft and allow local fans to see top prospects and future big-league stars in their hometowns. This announcement continues MLB’s commitment to preserving and growing baseball in communities around the United States.”

Sean Duncan, President of Prep Baseball Report, said: “We are honored to work with these ownership groups and Major League Baseball to assure the future of impactful, high-level baseball to the region and continue the legacy of deep community involvement from all of these teams. With more than 150 scouts and operations personnel coast-to-coast at the high school, collegiate and junior college levels, we take great pride in our ability to identify the nation’s top amateur draft prospects, which will ultimately make the MLB Draft League the preeminent league for draft-eligible players.”

OP-ED: Getting Slaughtered

The following is an opinion editorial authored by Todd Bartley, TalkWilliamsport.com, news@TalkWilliamsport.com.

When “OPINION: Campana Created Slaughter, Beiter May Pay The Price”, was published in late October 2019, it was in the context of Mayoral candidate Derek Slaughter, whom I publicly endorsed for the first time in my career.

The hope going into the election last year, was that his platform of, “transparency, efficiency and accountability” were actually firmly held beliefs and not punch lines on a yard sign or a billboard.

All of the warning signs of insincerity were there leading up to the election.

Slaughter had committed to a debate with his challenger Eric Beiter for late October at Lycoming College similar to the one held with the Lycoming County Commissioner candidates that month.

On multiple occasions leading up to the debate Slaughter gave me his word he would be there; until he decommitted in an e-mail and then went radio silent.

Was this yet another stalling tactic by a nouveau ruling class elite; by refusing to answer actual questions relating to his platform and policy positions?

As a matter of fact, stalling is the precursor to hiding.

Ironically, it was mere foreshadowing of his leadership style of staying in the bunker and shutting everything down during a pandemic.

 

TRANSPARENCY

The word transparency was on every “Slaughter for Mayor” yard sign, it was on every billboard, in every stump speech, in every garden club visit, in the hallways of the Williamsport Area School District.

Until, Mayor Slaughter was sworn into office and then transparency became opaque.

A number of Right to Know Law requests have been submitted to the City of Williamsport, Williamsport Bureau of Police and the Williamsport Area School District (WASD) seeking public records related to the “criminal sexual misconduct” case on the part of a Williamsport Area High School baseball player during the 2018 team trip in Myrtle Beach.

Lycoming County District Attorney Ryan Gardner described the recorded and disseminated on video “criminal sexual misconduct” as such; prior to referring the case to PA Attorney General Josh Shapiro.

At all times relevant to the 2018 Williamsport Area High School baseball team trip in Myrtle Beach, Derek Slaughter was a teacher at the school as well as a former girls basketball coach (9 seasons ending in 2016).

While preparing his final stretch run for Mayor, Slaughter accepted a transfer to teach at the middle school level.

Was this to distance himself from the investigation currently ongoing by PA Attorney General Josh Shapiro?

The fundamental question for Mayor Slaughter is, what did you know about the Myrtle Beach case and when did you know it?

There is no documentation of a ChildLine call from then teacher or current Mayor Slaughter regarding the Myrtle Beach case.

How does this lend itself to the campaign process of transparency?

 

LACK OF TRANSPARENCY AND ENGAGING IN DELAY TACTICS

On July 3, 2020, four specific Right to Know Law requests were submitted to the City of Williamsport. Included were a specific request to the Williamsport Bureau of Police and three specific requests of Mayor Slaughter.

A five-day response window was given.

On July 8, 2020, the Requesters received a notice from Janice Frank, City Clerk, City of Williamsport a 30-day extension was being requested for legal review.

Sounds transparent to me.

As the 30-day extension deadline approached, an additional 20-day extension was requested by the City of Williamsport in order to respond.

Sounds transparent to me.

Then on, August 24, 2020, the City of Williamsport finally provided responses, if they can be called that.

The responses were e-mailed to this author with a physical address listed of 1318 Winter Street, Williamsport, PA 17701.

That was not the address listed on the Right to Know Law requests.

The Office of Open Records recently determined the responses from the City of Williamsport were untimely. In terms Mayor Slaughter with his background in teaching will understand – he failed.

Based on the untimely responses, additional even more surgical Right to Know Law requests are being submitted to the City of Williamsport and the Williamsport Bureau of Police seeking public records – since the overwhelming evidence demonstrates their existence.

 

HOW DID WBP CHIEF HAGAN

UNDER PENALTY OF PERJURY MISS THE OBVIOUS IN HIS OPEN RECORDS AFFIDAVIT?

Attestation of Chief Hagan AP 2020-1827

As chronicled in “A Baseball Story In The Birthplace Of Little League Baseball – PART XX,

According to the WBP website“The mission of the Williamsport Bureau of Police is to ensure the safety and security of the community by providing exemplary law enforcement services.

The Williamsport Bureau of Police values the principles of honesty, integrity, honor, fairness, and respect in our interactions with those we serve. We are committed to achieving excellence in our services to our citizens through community-based, pro-active policing.”

In the first of many contradictions that will be demonstrated, when the WBP was contacted by Detective Aiesi of the Myrtle Beach Police Department (MBPD) as noted in Part XIII she said to WAHS Head Principal Brandon Pardoe, “we seem to be getting the runaround.”

 

The Williamsport Bureau of Police when asked about records related to the 2018 Williamsport Area High School baseball team trip in Myrtle Beach, the WBP answered “No Records exist”.

Sounds transparent to me.

 

How can “No Records exist”, when Sgt. Reeder is leaving voicemails with the Myrtle Beach Police Department?

From PART XX: THE WILLIAMSPORT BUREAU OF POLICE IN THEIR OWN WORDS

The REPORTING OFFICER NARRATIVE obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request, Myrtle Beach Police Department authored by Detective Glenn Porter goes onto say:

On 09/28/2018

I contacted the Williamsport city police at 570-(redacted by author) and spoke with an on-duty supervisor, Sgt. Reader. he advised that he would look into this and call me back since I do not have a victim’s name.

I later received a voicemail from him saying that their department did not take a report on this (redacted by MBPD).

Listed below is an e-mail obtained from the MBPD through the Freedom of Information Act which confirms the Sergeant Reeder voicemail on September 28, 2018.

From: Tiffany Whitmire
To: Glenn W. Porter; Kerry Aiesi
Subject: FW: Voice message from (redacted by MBPD)
Date: Friday, September 28, 2018 3:09:27 PM
SRO (redacted by MBPD) with (redacted by MBPD) at (redacted by MBPD)
—–Original Message—–
From: 570 (redacted by author) [mailto:(redacted by author)]
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2018 3:05 PM
To: Tiffany Whitmire <(redacted by author)>
Subject: Voice message from
Caller ID: (redacted by MBPD)
Message length: 60 sec. (486 kb.)

 

As part of the FOIA request made by this author; the MBPD provided the voicemail they received from  Sergeant Reeder of the WBP on Friday, September 28, 2018 at 3:05 PM.

SERGEANT REEDER VOICEMAIL TRANSCRIPTION

Hi, this is Sergeant Reeder with the Williamsport Police Department here in Pennsylvania. I’m trying to get a message to Officer Porter. 

Umm, he had contacted me about an incident down there over the summer or the spring.

Umm, it sounds like the uh (redacted by MBPD) who were involved in that, um go to (redacted by MBPD) which is a separate jurisdiction than ours. 

(EDITOR’S NOTE: On reason and belief it appears Sergeant Reeder inexplicably sent the MBPD Detectives to the South Williamsport School Resource Officer first.)

Umm, the officer you made contact with is (redacted by MBPD) he is the school resource officer for (redacted by MBPD) Police and he actually has some recent knowledge about that involved (redacted by MBPD) go to their school so.

We did not take a report, um, so I just wanted to pass that along and uh, the number for uh, (redacted by MBPD).

Thank you

 

 

How can “No Records exist”, when SRO Stoltzsfus is exchanging e-mails with the Myrtle Beach Police Department?

From PART XXDetective Porter of the MBPD in the REPORTING OFFICER NARRATIVE obtained through a FOIA added an entry:

I called and spoke with the School resource officer at South Williamsport High School, Officer Samar (redacted by MBPD).

Officer Samar informed me that he only became aware of this incident yesterday on 9/27/2018 from another colleague at the school (redacted by MBPD).

Officer Samar said that he had no other details but when he heard that some type of assault took place with students from the Williamsport Area High School, he placed a courtesy call to the School Resource Officer there named Jordan Stoltzfus.

When Officer Samar told Officer Stoltzfus about a possible incident, Officer Stoltzfus relayed to him that he has not heard of any such incident.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: The only reason South Williamsport School Resource Officer Samar was contacted and became involved in this report is the fact that Sergeant Reeder inexplicably sent the MBPD Detectives to him.)

If SRO Stoltzfus only heard about the Myrtle Beach incident in late September 2018, how did he participate in an “investigation” in May and June of that same year?

How do WAHS Head Principal Brandon Pardoe and Lycoming County Chief Detective Weber run concurrent criminal and non-criminal investigations into the Myrtle beach incident and not involve the WASD School Resource Officer?

Could it be the idea of the fewer people know, the better?

Did attorney George Lepley ever address this in the conversations with Weber or WASD Solicitor Fred Holland leading to the letter of May 31, 2018 authored by Lepley?

 

Porter from the same entry: I attempted to call Officer Stoltzfus at the school number 570-(redacted by author) but was informed he had already left for the day.

I was transferred to his voicemail and left a message for him to call me back.

I also was provided an e-mail address of (redacted by author).

I sent him an e-mail requesting him to respond to me as well.

 

The e-mail to SRO Stoltzfus was obtained through the FOIA request of the MBPD:

Officer Stoltzfus,

My name is Detective Porter with the City of Myrtle Beach Police Department. Today I was made aware via a Fox Sports Article that (redacted by MBPD) may have taken place and filmed on Social Media (redacted by MBPD).

As of know I am not aware any such (redacted by MBPD) was reported to us by anyone.

I was informed today that you recently were told about this from another SRO but your knowledge may be limited as well.

I just wanted to speak with you (redacted by MBPD).

The link to the article is below if you have not seen it. I look forward to hearing from you. You can reach are office line at 843-(redacted by author).

http://foxsportswilliamsport.com/millionaire-baseball-mayhem-in-myrtle-beach/

Thanks in advance,
Detective Glenn Porter Jr.
Investigations Division-Violent Crimes
Myrtle Beach Police Dept.
(redacted by author)

 

Sounds transparent to me.

 

Why is Police Chief Damon Hagan preparing his pension and retirement plans during an investigation of the 2018 Williamsport Area High School baseball team trip in Myrtle Beach by the PA AG Josh Shapiro?

As the Mayor of the City of Williamsport and these types of blatant contradictions of facts, to ensure the public trust in the Williamsport Bureau of Police, should Slaughter relieve Hagan of command, pending the outcome of the AG investigation?

Sounds like a transparent move to me.

Maybe Mayor Slaughter can clarify his contradictory and non-transparent answer regarding the anti-racism movement in Williamsport and his denial of permits to other groups who wished to protest.

 

SLAUGHTER CONTRADICTS HIMSELF IN AFFIDAVIT UNDER PENALTY OF PERJURY

#3 Any messages sent or received by Mayor Derek Slaughter to/from Morgan Allen and/or Michael Orrico, captured stored or removed from any city owned electronic devices issued by the City of Williamsport or personal phone or electronic devices used to conduct City of Williamsport business, specifically from January 1, 2020 – current date. Editor’s Note: the original RTKL submission was made on July 3, 2020. 

The ever transparent Mayor Derek Slaughter attestation 2020-1828 as follows:

Response #6: “For Request #3, I was unable to identify the records sought because the Requester did not provide a subject matter for the records sought within the request, and the request spanned more than six months.”

Response #7: “For Request #4, the City provided Requester, through the Open Records Officer and City Clerk Janice Frank, copies of phone logs for my cell phone used to conduct City business from January, 2020 to July, 2020, totaling 62 pages. The only information redacted from those call logs were phone numbers and the account number.” Editor’s Note: the information redacted included the very records sought by Requester.

Response #8: “My phone number associated with that account is not normally held out to the public as my contact number, so it was redacted.”

Response #9: “The incoming/outgoing phone numbers listed on those logs were also redacted because they include the personal phone numbers of others. Had the Requester asked for records reflecting calls to a specific phone number or numbers, the City could have searched these logs for records reflecting those communications. However, as requested it would be virtually impossible for the City to review the thousands of entries and cross-reference them with third-parties, in order to research and determine all of those that relate to personal numbers, and all of those that relate to public numbers.”

“I, Derek Slaughter, make these statements under penalty of perjury to the best of my knowledge information and belief as more set forth in Pa. C.S. 4904. Dated October 12, 2020.”  

 

So in an effort to boil this obvious act of non-transparency by the least transparent Mayor in Williamsport history, Derek Slaughter who is a college professor wants the public to believe he has no idea who calls him, or whom he calls; including his closest political advisers?

The request was quite specific indeed regarding who the Mayor speaks to regularly, “#3 Any messages sent or received by Mayor Derek Slaughter to/from Morgan Allen and/or Michael Orrico.”

And yet, Slaughter gets cute with his response, “I was unable to identify the records sought because the Requester did not provide a subject matter for the records sought within the request, and the request spanned more than six months.”

So Slaughter can identify the times he spoke with Allen and/or Orrico but must have the subject matter they discussed. Is that not why the Right to Know law exists to obtain exactly this type of information from elected officials trying to obscure it from public view?

Please keep saying how transparent you are; wait there’s more.

“My phone number associated with that account is not normally held out to the public as my contact number, so it was redacted.”

How exactly is the public suppose to reach you during a pandemic?

Your City Hall number?

As part of one of your early “public safety” measures you closed City Hall, the same City Hall you said in a candidate forum your administration would leave for a more viable location.

Those plans must be redacted from the public too.

During the campaign Slaughter authored this: “With the right leadership, we can make Williamsport a hub of business, culture, and innovation. Your voice and your vote matter. Please vote Derek Slaughter for Williamsport Mayor on Tuesday, November 5th.”

In the first year of Mayor Derek Slaughter tenure, his leadership has seen the closure of SHOP-VAC a major employer within the City of Williamsport. The loss of airline service from the airport. The potential relocation of the Community Theatre League to accommodate the “new city hall”.

The proposed move of CTL was halted when this author called Slaughter out and caused him to reverse course.

Innovation?

Really?

 

If you are not answering your City Hall number would the head if IT Chris Cooley have those called forwarded to, wait for it, your City owned/paid for cell phone?

I know, these facts are stubborn things, aren’t they?

Response #9: “The incoming/outgoing phone numbers listed on those logs were also redacted because they include the personal phone numbers of others. Had the Requester asked for records reflecting calls to a specific phone number or numbers, the City could have searched these logs for records reflecting those communications.

In fact, Requester did make that specific request by name.

Those specific numbers will be provided to the Mayor tomorrow in Right to Know Request the City then has 5 days to answer since the records have already been searched for, legally reviewed, produced and redacted.

See how easy it is to be transparent Mayor Slaughter?

 

Transparency from Mayor Slaughter could include the disclosure of all the calls he made to my cell phone leading into your election on his way to WAMS and then after school on his way to Penn College.

I lost count of how many times he called seeking guidance on the campaign and on issues of the day facing the City. Until he stopped calling after turning down the debate invitation.

What was it you said about what all the students kept saying about the Myrtle Beach case while you were a teacher at WAHS?

Let us leave that to the Office of Attorney General Josh Shapiro and his investigative team; since as a teacher that made you a mandated reporter.

You know, like you said after one of the many shootings in the City that have occurred during your brief tenure. Remember, the one you read about in the paper. Or was it the one you did not find out about until you woke up the next day.

You know, like you said in your press release on November 22. 2020:“We will say this over and over – if you see something, say something. Tell a trusted person you know to say something. If anyone has any information about these crimes, please come forward. Each of us is responsible to do the right thing to solve and prevent these crimes.”

 

There is only one thing more important to our community than see something, say something – its do something.

Mayor Slaughter and former WAHS girls basketball coach, the ball is in your court.

 

DID WASD SUPERINTENDENT BOWERS RECEIVE A QUID PRO QUO FOR HOLDING SLAUGHTER TEACHING JOB IN PLACE – BY BEING NAMED TO MAYOR C19 ADVISORY BOARD?

On April 21, 2020, Mayor Slaughter Forms COVID-19 Advisory Board as reported on this website. “In response to the needs of the greater community, I created the Mayor’s COVID-19 Advisory Board. This board of key stakeholders will identify the impact, needs, and a path forward for Williamsport.”

Chalked up to the oops I almost forgot category, and still getting partial credit for their homework albeit late on April 23, 2020 Mayor Slaughter added two more members to the Advisory Board.

The two additional members were Ron Frick, President of Lycoming County United Way and Dr. Tim Bowers, superintendent of the Williamsport Area School District.

The family of JOHN DOE #1 in the Myrtle Beach case is STILL waiting on your calls.

 

THE NATION WILL BE WATCHING WHEN IT ALL COMES CRASHING DOWN

When the national media rolls the satellite trucks in here; you Derek Slaughter will be the Mayor of the City and an employee in the Williamsport Area School District that allowed it to happen.

So the nation and the world will then witness what “Getting Slaughtered” from a media, reputation, and quality of life standpoint looks like.

Mayor Slaughter, I just hope it was all worth it; like former WAHS high school baseball player Cody Shimp said, “sticking together until the end.”

That is what actual, “Transparency, Efficiency and Accountability” really look like in the real world.

November 28, 2020 – Department of Health Report

Eighty five (85) new cases added Saturday in Lycoming County now at 2,067 cases, 2 new deaths, 38 total deaths, with 18,934 negatives according to DOH report.

Department of Health Provides Update on COVID-19: 

4,114 Patients Hospitalized and 864 Patients in the Intensive Care Unit  

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Health today confirmed as of 12:00 a.m., November 28, that there were 8,053 additional positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 351,667.

There are 2,904 individuals hospitalized with COVID-19. Of that number, 864 patients are in the intensive care unit with COVID-19. Most of the patients hospitalized are ages 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. More data is available here.

The trend in the 14-day moving average of number of hospitalized patients per day has increased by nearly 2,300 since the end of September.

Statewide percent positivity for the week of November 20 – November 26 stood at 11.7%.

The most accurate daily data is available on the website, with archived data also available.

The number of tests administered within the last 7 days between November 21 and November 27 is 415,677 with 49,103 positive cases. There were 61,780 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., November 27.

As of 11:59 p.m., Friday, November 27, there were 41 new deaths reported for a total of 10,275 deaths attributed to COVID-19. County-specific information and a statewide map are available on the COVID-19 Data Dashboard. 

Mask-wearing is required in all businesses and whenever leaving home. Consistent mask-wearing is critical to preventing the spread of COVID-19.

There are 16,392 individuals who have a positive viral antigen test and are considered probable cases and 639 individuals who have a positive serology test and either COVID-19 symptoms or a high-risk exposure.

There are 2,804,464 individuals who have tested negative to date. Of those who have tested positive to date the age breakdown is as follows:

  •       Approximately 1% are ages 0-4;
  •       Nearly 3% are ages 5-12;
  •      Nearly 6% are ages 13-18;
  •      Nearly 13% are ages 19-24;
  •      Nearly 37% are ages 25-49;
  •      Nearly 22% are ages 50-64; and
  •      Nearly 20% are ages 65 or older.

The department has seen significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds. An alert was sent to healthcare providers about the changing COVID-19 case demographics. Increases among 19 to 24-year-olds from April to present in November are available below:

  •       NC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to approximately 16 percent of cases so far in November;
  •       NE – 6 percent of cases in April to approximately 13 percent of cases so far in November;
  •       SE – Nearly 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 11 percent of cases so far in November;
  •      SW – Approximately 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 11 percent of cases so far in November;
  •      SC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to approximately 8 percent of cases so far in November; and
  •      NW – Nearly 7 percent of cases in April to approximately 11 percent of cases so far in November.

In nursing and personal care homes, there are 32,915 resident cases of COVID-19, and 1,232 cases among employees, for a total of 39,381 at 1,232 distinct facilities in 63 counties. Out of our total deaths, 6,430 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities. A county breakdown can be found here.

Approximately 14,198 of our total cases are among health care workers.

The Wolf Administration stresses the role Pennsylvanians play in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:

  •       Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  •       Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
  •       Clean surfaces frequently.
  •       Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
  •       If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.
  •       Download the COVID Alert PA app and make your phone part of the fight. The free app can be found in the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store by searching for “covid alert pa”.

All Pennsylvania residents are encouraged to sign up for AlertPA, a text notification system for health, weather, and other important alerts like COVID-19 updates from commonwealth agencies. Residents can sign up online at www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/Signup-For-Alerts.