State Police Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement November 23-26: 746 Compliance Checks; 22 Notices of Violation

 
Harrisburg, PA – Pennsylvania State Police Liquor Control Enforcement Officers visited 746 licensed liquor establishments from Monday, November 23 through Thursday, November 26 to ensure businesses are abiding by COVID-19 mitigation requirements that include social distancing, masking, and other health and safety requirements of the liquor code.
Liquor Control Enforcement Officers issued 22 notices of violation and 30 warnings for failing to follow COVID-19 requirements. As mandated by the liquor code, a notice of violation precedes the issuance of an administrative citation, which is civil in nature, and is intended to provide licensed liquor establishments notification of the nature of violation(s) discovered. The investigation remains open during this period, pending review by the Pennsylvania State Police Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement (BLCE). Because the investigation is ongoing, names of establishments issued a notice of violation will not be released at this time. Each BLCE district office posts a monthly public information release that includes details on citations issued by that office.
Compliance checks are unannounced and can occur anywhere in the commonwealth, although the focus is on areas experiencing higher coronavirus transmission rates. Among other requirements, all businesses and employees in the restaurant and retail food service industry authorized to conduct in-person activities are mandated to:
  • Require all customers to wear masks while entering, exiting or otherwise traveling throughout the restaurant or retail food service business (face masks may be removed while seated). Further, employees are required to wear masks at all times.
  • Provide at least six feet between parties at tables or physical barriers between customers where booths are arranged back to back.
  • Ensure maximum occupancy limits for indoor and outdoor areas are posted and enforced.
Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement | November 23-26, 2020
​TOTAL LICENSEE CHECKS
WARNINGS RELATED TO COVID-19 MITIGATION EFFORTS
NOTICES OF VIOLATION RELATED TO COVID-19 MITIGATION EFFORTS
1-Philadelphia
​166
6
5
2-Wilkes-Barre
104
3
5
3-Harrisburg
51
1
4
4-Pittsburgh
134
10
3
5-Altoona
50
2
2
6-Williamsport
20
0
0
7-Punxsutawney
87
2
2
8-Erie
19
1
1
9-Allentown
115
5
0
TOTALS
746
30
22
Violators may face administrative citation by the Pennsylvania State Police Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement. Continued violations put an establishment’s liquor license at risk, either through the citation process or upon application for renewal. More information is available on the enforcement page of the state police COVID-19 portal.
Complaints regarding licensees not complying with COVID-19 mitigation mandates may be directed to the BLCE at 1-800-932-0602 or reported through the BLCE’s online complaint form.

November 27, 2020 – Department of Health Report

Fifty seven (57) new cases added Friday in Lycoming County now at 1,982 cases, no new deaths, 36 total deaths, with 18,934 negatives according to DOH report.

Department of Health Provides Update on COVID-19:

4,087 Patients Hospitalized and 877 Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

Two-day total of 15,785 additional positive cases

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Health today confirmed as of 12:00 a.m., November 27, that there were 7,360 new cases, in addition to 8,425 new cases reported Thursday, November 26 for a two-day total of 15,785 additional positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 343,614.

There are 4,087 individuals hospitalized with COVID-19. Of that number, 877 patients are in the intensive care unit with COVID-19. Most of the patients hospitalized are ages 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. More data is available here.

Statewide percent positivity for the week of November 13 – November 19 stood at 11.1%.

The most accurate daily data is available on the website, with archived data also available.

The number of tests administered within the last 7 days between November 20 and November 26 is 464,069 with 38,851 positive cases. There were 58,103 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., November 25 and 57,971 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., November 26.

As of 11:59 p.m., Wednesday November 25, there were 118 new deaths and as of 11:59 p.m., Thursday November 26, there were 21 new deaths reported for a total of 10,234 deaths attributed to COVID-19. County-specific information and a statewide map are available on the COVID-19 Data Dashboard.

Mask-wearing is required in all businesses and whenever leaving home. Consistent mask-wearing is critical to preventing the spread of COVID-19.

There are 15,869 individuals who have a positive viral antigen test and are considered probable cases and 643 individuals who have a positive serology test and either COVID-19 symptoms or a high-risk exposure.

There are 2,786,075 individuals who have tested negative to date. Of those who have tested positive to date the age breakdown is as follows:

  • Approximately 1% are ages 0-4;
  • Nearly 3% are ages 5-12;
  • Nearly 6% are ages 13-18;
  • Nearly 13% are ages 19-24;
  • Nearly 37% are ages 25-49;
  • Approximately 21% are ages 50-64; and
  • Nearly 20% are ages 65 or older.

The department has seen significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds. An alert was sent to healthcare providers about the changing COVID-19 case demographics. Increases among 19 to 24-year-olds from April to present in November are available below:

  • NC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 16 percent of cases so far in November;
  • NE – 6 percent of cases in April to approximately 13 percent of cases so far in November;
  • SE – Nearly 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 11 percent of cases so far in November;
  • NW – Nearly 7 percent of cases in April to approximately 11 percent of cases so far in November.
  • SW – Approximately 5 percent of cases in April to approximately 10 percent of cases so far in November;
  • SC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to approximately 8 percent of cases so far in November

In nursing and personal care homes, there are 33,947 resident cases of COVID-19, and 6,553 cases among employees, for a total of 40,500 at 1,249 distinct facilities in 63 counties. Out of our total deaths, 6,459 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities. A county breakdown can be found here.

Approximately 14,336 of our total cases are among health care workers.

Statewide – The Wolf Administration has since noon, Nov. 25:

The Wolf Administration stresses the role Pennsylvanians play in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
  • Clean surfaces frequently.
  • Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
  • If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.
  • Download the COVID Alert PA app and make your phone part of the fight. The free app can be found in the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store by searching for “covid alert pa”.

All Pennsylvania residents are encouraged to sign up for AlertPA, a text notification system for health, weather, and other important alerts like COVID-19 updates from commonwealth agencies. Residents can sign up online at www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/Signup-For-Alerts.

November 26, 2020 – Department of Health Report

Eighty five (85) new cases added Thursday in Lycoming County now at 1,925 cases, no new deaths, 36 total deaths, with 18,934 negatives according to DOH report.

Department of Health Provides Update on COVID-19:

4,087 Patients Hospitalized and 877 Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

Two-day total of 15,785 additional positive cases

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Health today confirmed as of 12:00 a.m., November 27, that there were 7,360 new cases, in addition to 8,425 new cases reported Thursday, November 26 for a two-day total of 15,785 additional positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 343,614.

There are 4,087 individuals hospitalized with COVID-19. Of that number, 877 patients are in the intensive care unit with COVID-19. Most of the patients hospitalized are ages 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. More data is available here.

Statewide percent positivity for the week of November 13 – November 19 stood at 11.1%.

The most accurate daily data is available on the website, with archived data also available.

The number of tests administered within the last 7 days between November 20 and November 26 is 464,069 with 38,851 positive cases. There were 58,103 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., November 25 and 57,971 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., November 26.

As of 11:59 p.m., Wednesday November 25, there were 118 new deaths and as of 11:59 p.m., Thursday November 26, there were 21 new deaths reported for a total of 10,234 deaths attributed to COVID-19. County-specific information and a statewide map are available on the COVID-19 Data Dashboard.

Mask-wearing is required in all businesses and whenever leaving home. Consistent mask-wearing is critical to preventing the spread of COVID-19.

There are 15,869 individuals who have a positive viral antigen test and are considered probable cases and 643 individuals who have a positive serology test and either COVID-19 symptoms or a high-risk exposure.

There are 2,786,075 individuals who have tested negative to date. Of those who have tested positive to date the age breakdown is as follows:

  • Approximately 1% are ages 0-4;
  • Nearly 3% are ages 5-12;
  • Nearly 6% are ages 13-18;
  • Nearly 13% are ages 19-24;
  • Nearly 37% are ages 25-49;
  • Approximately 21% are ages 50-64; and
  • Nearly 20% are ages 65 or older.

The department has seen significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds. An alert was sent to healthcare providers about the changing COVID-19 case demographics. Increases among 19 to 24-year-olds from April to present in November are available below:

  • NC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 16 percent of cases so far in November;
  • NE – 6 percent of cases in April to approximately 13 percent of cases so far in November;
  • SE – Nearly 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 11 percent of cases so far in November;
  • NW – Nearly 7 percent of cases in April to approximately 11 percent of cases so far in November.
  • SW – Approximately 5 percent of cases in April to approximately 10 percent of cases so far in November;
  • SC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to approximately 8 percent of cases so far in November

In nursing and personal care homes, there are 33,947 resident cases of COVID-19, and 6,553 cases among employees, for a total of 40,500 at 1,249 distinct facilities in 63 counties. Out of our total deaths, 6,459 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities. A county breakdown can be found here.

Approximately 14,336 of our total cases are among health care workers.

Statewide – The Wolf Administration has since noon, Nov. 25:

The Wolf Administration stresses the role Pennsylvanians play in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
  • Clean surfaces frequently.
  • Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
  • If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.
  • Download the COVID Alert PA app and make your phone part of the fight. The free app can be found in the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store by searching for “covid alert pa”.

Updated Coronavirus Links: Press Releases, State Lab Photos, Graphics

All Pennsylvania residents are encouraged to sign up for AlertPA, a text notification system for health, weather, and other important alerts like COVID-19 updates from commonwealth agencies. Residents can sign up online at www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/Signup-For-Alerts.

Dept. of Agriculture Releases COVID-19 Restaurant Enforcement Actions, November 16 – November 22

 

Harrisburg, PA – The Department of Agriculture today released data related to COVID-19 restaurant enforcement actions from November 16 through November 22, 2020. The information is specific to COVID-19 mitigation requirements for restaurants including social distancing, masking, and occupancy limits.

These numbers include actions taken during routine food safety inspections and inspections prompted by consumer complaints.

From November 16 through November 22, the Bureau of Food Safety performed 667 total inspections, 25 of which were complaint-driven; 19 were COVID-19 specific complaints. The bureau distributed 48 COVID-19 complaint-driven educational letters. 8 COVID-19 related complaints were referred to local and county health jurisdictions. Five formal Warning Letters were issued and three citations were filed.

A county by county breakdown of COVID-19 restaurant enforcement actions can be found on the Department of Agriculture’s website. The data will be updated weekly, with data from the previous week.

Among other requirements, all businesses in the restaurant and retail food service industry authorized to conduct in-person activities are mandated to:

  • Require all customers to wear a mask while entering, exiting, or otherwise traveling through the restaurant or retail food service business (mask may be removed while seated).
  • Employees are required to wear masks at all times.
  • Provide at least six feet between parties at tables or physical barriers between customers where booths are arranged back to back.
  • Ensure maximum occupancy limits for indoor and outdoor areas are posted and enforced.

The Bureau of Food Safety has always operated with an education-first model, and always works to educate and correct on-site before taking official action. Businesses unwilling to correct on-site will first receive a warning letter. Following an initial warning, food safety inspectors will follow up with unannounced inspections to ensure compliance or issue citations as necessary. On subsequent visits, violators may receive a citation and/or fine ranging from $25 to $300 per offense.

In addition to these monetary citations, a retail establishment or restaurant will be required to close for a period of up to 24 hours beginning the day of the second violation. During the closure, the establishment is required to complete rigorous cleaning and then reimpose all mitigation measures to come in compliance with the governor’s order. Failure to comply will result in enhanced penalties upon revisit and referral for criminal prosecution for obstructing the administration of law or other government functions, pursuant to the Pennsylvania crimes code.

Consumers with general food safety complaints or concerns about non-compliance for COVID-19 mitigation can file a report online. COVID-19 mitigation restaurant enforcement actions will be released on a weekly basis.

For more information about the Department of Agriculture’s COVID-19 response, visit agriculture.pa.gov/covid.

Wolf Administration to Use Wireless Emergency Alert System for COVID-19 Messaging 

Harrisburg, PA – Today, the Wolf Administration will begin using the national Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) system to provide important public messages about the COVID-19 pandemic.

WEA is a national public safety system that allows customers who own compatible mobile devices to receive geographically targeted, text-like messages alerting them of imminent threats to safety in their area. The WEA system is commonly used to issue time-sensitive and life-saving alerts, such as Amber Alerts or severe weather warnings.

The Federal Communication Commission’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau allows the state, as an authorized alert originator of messages, to use the WEA system as a COVID-19 communications tool.

Pennsylvania’s first message will be sent statewide today, with the option to target specific regions of the state for future messages. For example, if one region of the state is experiencing an exceptionally high surge in COVID-19 cases, cellphone users may in that region may receive an alert with information about staying at home or where to find an available COVID-19 testing site in their area.

“WEA is one more way to reach as many Pennsylvanians as we can to provide timely information on COVID-19,” Governor Tom Wolf said. “This tool is another tool in our toolkit to fight the pandemic and unite against COVID.”

Message content, in both English and Spanish, is a combined effort of the Department of Health and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. PEMA will send alerts through FEMA’s Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) to participating wireless carriers, which then push the alerts to compatible mobile devices in the area. Wireless companies volunteer to participate in WEA.

According to the Federal Communications Commission, since its launch in 2012, the WEA system has been used nearly 56,000 times to warn the public about dangerous weather, missing children, and other critical situations – all through alerts on compatible cell phones and other mobile devices.

STATEMENT FROM THE BALTIMORE RAVENS

We appreciate the NFL for its diligence in working closely with us to ensure the well-being of players, coaches and staff from both the Baltimore Ravens and Pittsburgh Steelers organizations.

Protecting the health and safety of each team, in addition to our communities at large, is of utmost importance. We will continue to follow guidance from the NFL and its medical experts, as we focus on safely resuming preparations for Sunday’s game.

Pennsylvanians Encouraged To Shop Virtual, Curbside This Holiday Season 

Harrisburg, PA – Today, Department of Community of Economic Development (DCED) Secretary Dennis Davin encouraged Pennsylvanians to support local businesses safely this year by only shopping virtually and utilizing curbside pickup options.

“Black Friday is enjoyed by both consumers and retailers alike and is a tradition that we encourage people to celebrate in the safest way this year,” said Sec. Davin. “With the recent additions of Small Business Saturday and Cyber Monday, shoppers now have a vast array of options this holiday season to safely support their favorite retailers—including e-commerce platforms, ordering by phone, purchasing downloadable gift certificates, and picking up products curbside. This year, to keep Pennsylvanians safe and healthy, those options are more important than ever.” 

COVID-19 is a highly contagious virus that spreads through the air by coughing or sneezing; through close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands; and by touching an object or surface with the virus on it—all vehicles for transmission when individuals are gathered in groups, crowds, or public settings. While masks are required at all times in all retail establishments in the commonwealth, by shopping virtually and using curbside pickup, Pennsylvanians can limit their risk of contracting and spreading the virus.

With new modeling projecting 22,000 new COVID-19 cases per day in Pennsylvania in December, Governor Tom Wolf and Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine recently announced new targeted mitigation measures to help stop the spread during this critical time.

Additionally, to keep everyone safe this holiday season and limit the spread of COVID-19, the Wolf Administration is advising Pennsylvanians to stay at home.  Those who must go out in public for necessities are reminded to:

  • Observe social distancing guidelines in public
  • Wash your hands frequently
  • Wear a mask both indoors and outdoors
  • ​Continue to keep your distance from people who do not live in your household and avoid crowds
  • Download the COVID Alert PA app

For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19, Pennsylvanians should follow www.governor.pa.gov and www.doh.pa.gov.

Gov. Wolf Signs Bills into Law, Vetoes Bills that Put Public Health at Risk

Harrisburg, Pa. – Today, Governor Tom Wolf signed into law House bills 30, 64, 616, 777, 862, 941, 942, 1342, 1534, 1538, 1617, 1662, 1808, 1962, 2233, 2293 and 2296 and Senate bills 835, 983, 1193, 1214, 1216, 1241, 1268 and 1309.

House Bill 30, which increases the optional organ donation check-off contribution for vehicle owners renewing a car’s registration to help stabilize the Robert P. Casey Memorial Organ and Tissue Donation Awareness Trust Fund.

House Bill 64, which allows professional licensing boards and commissions within the Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs to permit their licensees to carry over continuing education credits in excess of the number required for biennial renewal.

House Bill 616, which places the drug Carfentanil on the Schedule II list of controlled substances.

House Bill 777, which allows clubs to use small games of chance proceeds to cover operating expenses during and up to one year following the termination of a proclamation of disaster emergency related to the COVID-19 pandemic and provides for reporting requirements.

House Bill 862, which authorizes the commonwealth to join the Physical Therapy Licensure Compact.

House Bill 941, which increases transparency regarding pharmacy benefit manager pricing practices, specifically with regard to the state’s Medicaid program.

House Bill 942, which revises the composition of membership of the commonwealth’s Pharmaceutical and Therapeutics Committee.

House Bill 1342, which expands vision screening requirements and standards for children prior to admission to school for the first time.

House Bill 1534, which updates and expands the commonwealth’s anti-pyramid scheme law.

House Bill 1538, which allows the Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole to wait up to three years to consider another parole application from certain violent offenders after denying a parole application.

House Bill 1617, which makes changes to the act known as the Liquor Code regarding the treatment of malt or brewed beverages and allowing for the conversion of a hotel license to a restaurant license upon application to the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board.

House Bill 1662, which renames the Methadone Death and Incident Review Act as the Medication Death and Incident Review Act and expands the scope of the Act to cover all medications approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of opioid use disorder.

House Bill 1808, which requires the conversion of post-use polymers through advanced recycling to comply with applicable EPA and DEP regulations and revises applicable definitions.

House Bill 1962, which requires SERS and PSERS to perform an annual stress test and submit results to the Governor, General Assembly and the Independent Fiscal Office.

House Bill 2233, which permits political subdivisions and volunteer emergency services to enter into written agreements for the commingling of tax-free motor fuel and allow political subdivisions to transfer tax-free motor fuels to volunteer emergency services.

House Bill 2293, which requires any utility that delivers natural gas liquids through high consequence areas to make the utility’s emergency response plan available, upon written request, to certain state and emergency management officials.

House Bill 2296, which updates requirements and restrictions for commercial driver’s license holders, including reporting requirements for violations.

Senate Bill 835, which promotes and supports the expansion of broadband access in underserved areas of the commonwealth.

Senate Bill 983, which expands and revises the health screening requirements for newborns.

Senate Bill 1193, which provides for funding for the PA Sheriff and Deputy Sheriff Education and Training Board.

Senate Bill 1214, which authorizes DGS, with the approval of the Governor and State Departments to grant and convey certain lands, buildings and improvements, easements.

Senate Bill 1216, which amends the Public School Code, including to provide temporary flexibility in teacher certification requirements and other provisions related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Senate Bill 1241, which amends the Administrative Code, in powers and duties of the Department of General Services and its departmental administrative and advisory boards and commissions, providing for report of State facilities owned or leased.

Senate Bill 1268, which provides for certification of temporary nurse aides hired during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Senate Bill 1309, which authorizes the Department of Transportation, with the approval of the Governor, to grant and convey High Properties, LP, a certain tract of unimproved land situated in Manheim Township, Lancaster County.

The governor also vetoed House bills 1747 and 2440 and Senate Bill 790.

November 25, 2020 – Department of Health Report

Forty seven (47) new cases added Wednesday in Lycoming County now at 1,840 cases, one new death, 36 total deaths, with 18,635 negatives according to DOH report.

Department of Health Provides Update on COVID-19:

3,897 Patients Hospitalized and 826 Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

6,759 Additional Positive Cases of COVID-19

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Health today confirmed as of 12:00 a.m., November 25, that there were 6,759 additional positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 327,829.

There are 3,897 individuals hospitalized with COVID-19. Of that number, 826 patients are in the intensive care unit with COVID-19. Most of the patients hospitalized are ages 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. More data is available here.

The trend in the 14-day moving average of number of hospitalized patients per day has increased by nearly 2,300 since the end of September.

Statewide percent positivity for the week of November 13 – November 19 stood at 11.1%.

The most accurate daily data is available on the website, with archived data also available.

The number of tests administered within the last 7 days between November 18 and November 24 is 405,184 with 45,557 positive cases. There were 56,197 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m., November 24.

As of 11:59 p.m., Tuesday, November 24, there were 144 new deaths reported for a total of 10,095 deaths attributed to COVID-19. County-specific information and a statewide map are available on the COVID-19 Data Dashboard.

Mask-wearing is required in all businesses and whenever leaving home. Consistent mask-wearing is critical to preventing the spread of COVID-19.

There are 14,361 individuals who have a positive viral antigen test and are considered probable cases and 643 individuals who have a positive serology test and either COVID-19 symptoms or a high-risk exposure.

There are 2,743,221 individuals who have tested negative to date. Of those who have tested positive to date the age breakdown is as follows:

  • Approximately 1% are ages 0-4;
  • Nearly 3% are ages 5-12;
  • Nearly 6% are ages 13-18;
  • Nearly 13% are ages 19-24;
  • Nearly 37% are ages 25-49;
  • Approximately 21% are ages 50-64; and
  • Nearly 20% are ages 65 or older.

The department has seen significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds. An alert was sent to healthcare providers about the changing COVID-19 case demographics. Increases among 19 to 24-year-olds from April to present in November are available below:

  • NC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to approximately 16 percent of cases so far in November;
  • NE – 6 percent of cases in April to approximately 13 percent of cases so far in November;
  • SE – Nearly 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 11 percent of cases so far in November;
  • SW – Approximately 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 11 percent of cases so far in November;
  • NW – Nearly 7 percent of cases in April to approximately 11 percent of cases so far in November; and
  • SC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 9 percent of cases so far in November.

In nursing and personal care homes, there are 32,915 resident cases of COVID-19, and 6,466 cases among employees, for a total of 39,381 at 1,232 distinct facilities in 64 counties. Out of our total deaths, 6,430 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities. A county breakdown can be found here.

Approximately 14,198 of our total cases are among health care workers.
 

Statewide – The Wolf Administration has since noon, Nov. 24:
 

The Wolf Administration stresses the role Pennsylvanians play in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
  • Clean surfaces frequently.
  • Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
  • If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.
  • Download the COVID Alert PA app and make your phone part of the fight. The free app can be found in the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store by searching for “covid alert pa”.

All Pennsylvania residents are encouraged to sign up for AlertPA, a text notification system for health, weather, and other important alerts like COVID-19 updates from commonwealth agencies. Residents can sign up online at www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/Signup-For-Alerts.

Governor Wolf Signs Renewal to COVID-19 Disaster Declaration

Harrisburg, PA – Yesterday Governor Tom Wolf signed a third renewal of his 90-day Proclamation of Disaster Emergency for the COVID-19 pandemic. The first proclamation was signed on March 6, following the announcement of the first two presumptive positive cases of the virus in Pennsylvania.

“With cases and hospitalizations increasing, we cannot afford to let down our guard,” said Governor Wolf. “This renewal will allow the commonwealth to maintain its response and support efforts as we face increasing case numbers and decreasing hospital capacity.”

The emergency disaster declaration provides for increased support to state agencies involved in the continued response to the virus and recovery for the state during reopening. This includes expediting supply procurement and lifting certain regulations to allow for efficient and effective mitigation.

The disaster declaration has allowed for waivers and extensions to continue to provide for Pennsylvanians and businesses under the unprecedented circumstances of the pandemic, including the ability to waive the one-week waiting period to receive unemployment compensation, work search requirements, and the registration with PA CareerLink for applicants, and to provide relief from charges for employers; and allowing the commonwealth to suspend numerous training requirements and certification and licensure renewals for health care professionals, child care workers, direct care workers, direct support professionals, among other professional groups who provide life-sustaining services to our children, seniors, and vulnerable residents.

Through the disaster declaration, PEMA has been able to mission assign the National Guard to provide various types of support for long term care facilities, including providing direct patient care support, ancillary support, and testing, and at community-based testing sites. It also provides PEMA with the ability to leverage continued federal support such as non-congregate sheltering.

The renewed disaster declaration will continue to support all of these efforts, as well as allow the commonwealth to rapidly scale response efforts and employ new intervention tactics, such as the administration of a vaccine.

The Department of Health’s Department Operations Center at PEMA continues to be active, as is the Commonwealth Response Coordination Center there.

A Proclamation of Disaster Emergency is effective for a 90-day period unless sooner rescinded or extended by official action of the Governor.